By Adler R.J.

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We can also conceive of a relation of representation grounded in a causal relation in which the subject is causally active. God, for example, does not need to be affected by objects in order to have cognition of those objects. As an archetypal intellect, God’s cognitions are immediately reality. Such a capacity does not exist in finite beings, however, and except in the case of agency our cognitions do not serve as archetypes for reality. In light of these considerations, it would appear that sensory affection is the only ground of a relation of representation for finite subjects such as ourselves.

Thus the product of this affection counts as a representation of the object, Kant asserts, due to the regular causal relation between objects of sensibility and the sensory capacities of the subject. We can also conceive of a relation of representation grounded in a causal relation in which the subject is causally active. God, for example, does not need to be affected by objects in order to have cognition of those objects. As an archetypal intellect, God’s cognitions are immediately reality. Such a capacity does not exist in finite beings, however, and except in the case of agency our cognitions do not serve as archetypes for reality.

This synthetic method, and the results of the Critique of Pure Reason, set the agenda for the Idealism that followed Kant. The first stage of Idealism: Grounding the Critique Kant’s development of his critical system set the stage for an unprecedented enthusiasm concerning the prospects for philosophy. While Kant worked to extend the theory of cognition of the first Critique to the spheres of ethics, aesthetics, and teleology, his successors recognized the importance of his revolution in method and believed that the essential features of an enduring philosophical system could be laid out in short order.

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