By Martin J. Wiener

An Empire on Trial is the 1st publication to discover the difficulty of interracial murder within the British Empire in the course of its top - reading those incidents and the prosecution of such situations in every one of 7 colonies scattered during the international. It uncovers and analyzes the tensions of empire that underlay British rule and delves into how the matter of keeping a liberal empire manifested itself within the overdue 19th and early 20th centuries. The paintings demonstrates the significance of the tactics of felony justice to the historical past of the empire and the good thing about a trans-territorial method of knowing the complexities and nuances of its workings. An Empire on Trial is of curiosity to these all in favour of race, empire, or legal justice, and to historians of contemporary Britain or of colonial Australia, India, Kenya, or the Caribbean. Political and postcolonial theorists writing on liberalism and empire, or race and empire, also will locate this ebook worthy.

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Extra resources for An Empire on Trial: Race, Murder, and Justice under British Rule, 1870-1935

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D. dissertation, Boston College, 2000. Benjamin T. Hall, Socialism and Sailors, Fabian Society Tract 46 (London, 1893), p. 3. On the High Seas 25 within the jurisdiction of the Admiralty (in other words, on a ship flying the British flag) could be tried in any colony as if they had been committed within the waters of the colony. This was followed the next year by a measure that raised the bar for treatment of seamen, the Merchant Shipping Act 1850. ” Although it was primarily motivated by the desire to raise the standard of British seamanship, it also was meant to protect seamen from being exploited by the shipowners or tyrannized by their officers.

58–59]. R v Hill: Liverpool Mercury, 29 Aug. 1845, p. 2; see also NA, HO 18/158 /48. On the High Seas 29 and that the chastisement was reasonable, or he would be criminally responsible. 29 In neither trial was there any indication that the victim’s race lessened the outrage of Judge or jury. In 1874, Captain Charles Barnes of the Locksley Hall had the misfortune to return to London with a seaman in irons for being insubordinate and mutinous at the height of Samuel Plimsoll’s agitation for seamen’s safety, which relied on melodramatic portrayals of disasters at sea made possible by wicked shipowners who neglected the welfare of their workers in order to maximize their profits.

Marryatt’s sea fiction exhibits this development. In his later and more famous novel, Mr. Midshipman Easy (1836), the harsh side of sea life was less visible, and the only figures to be flogged were obvious villains. For a discussion, see John Peck, Maritime Fiction: Sailors and the Sea in British and American Novels, 1719–1917 (London, 2001). D. dissertation, Boston College, 2000. Benjamin T. Hall, Socialism and Sailors, Fabian Society Tract 46 (London, 1893), p. 3. On the High Seas 25 within the jurisdiction of the Admiralty (in other words, on a ship flying the British flag) could be tried in any colony as if they had been committed within the waters of the colony.

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